Credit Score Improving Your Score

Fastest Ways to Raise Your Credit Score 100 Points

Ask for “good will removal” of a late payment

You might be surprised to learn that a single late payment could potentially cause a 100 point score drop for someone with a credit score of 750 or higher.

The reason why a consumer with such stellar credit scores could see such a huge score decrease after just one late payment is because credit scores take the path of least resistance, like water. It’s easier for a consumer with a high score to experience a 100 point score drop than it is for a consumer with a low score to experience a score drop of the same magnitude.

While it’s a long shot, it’s possible for a customer to convince his creditor to remove a late payment from his credit reports. When a creditor removes an accurate late payment for a customer it is known as a “good will removal.”

Good will removals are not always granted but if a customer has an otherwise flawless payment record with a creditor then the likelihood will be much higher. Whether or not it works, it certainly will not hurt the consumer to ask.

Correct an error to raise your credit score

The Federal Trade Commission suggests that 10 to 21 percent of consumers have errors on their credit reports. Fixing them can help raise your credit score.

There’s a chance that an error on your credit report may be behind your lower credit scores. You can identify errors by pulling your credit reports for free at annualcreditreport.com.

If you find an error you can dispute the account with the credit reporting agencies. If the error is confirmed and deleted by the credit reporting agencies, and the item was causing the lower scores, then they should improve and improve considerably.

About the author

John Ulzheimer

9 Comments

  • How many times can a creditor put the same collection on and off your credit. I have a collection agency after me for $106.00, and in less then one year they have put it on my report 3 times and have taken it off my report twice. It is currently sitting on all my reports. Everytime they put it on my score drops significantly and when they take it off, I do not see the same significant rise in my score. Is there a law that bars them from doing this to me? It has cost me more then 100 points on my credit score.

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