Debt Consolidation Debt Help

How to Snowball Your Debt the Right Way

Finally, Suzie has an extra $150 per month to put toward Debt C (the minimum payment of Debt B plus the $100 extra she had). This, plus the required $50 minimum payment, allows her to pay $200 per month on this debt. This debt has been reduced by $50 per month over the 18 months she’s been focused on Debt A and Debt B, so she only has $4,456 left to go. At this rate, she will pay it off in 24 months.

The total number of months it will take Suzie to pay off her entire debt? 42 months — or three and a half years.

If you run this scenario backwards and start with a $100 monthly payment on Debt C, it will take 57 months to pay off. Debt B and Debt A would already have been paid off by this point just by paying the minimum, so there’s not much of an advantage to starting with the biggest bill as long as interest rates are the same.

Hypothetical Debtor: Paul Profligate

How does the interest rate change things? Let’s look at Paul Profligate’s debts and terms:

Debt A: $2,000 at 2% interest

Debt B: $2,000 at 6% interest

Debt C: $2,000 at 12% interest

Again, we’ll assume that minimum payments are $50 per month.

Interest Rate: Start Big or Small?

If Paul begins by focusing on his lowest interest rate first, paying the $50 minimum and an extra $50 each month, he will pay off Debt A (only 2% interest) in 21 months.

Now Paul has an extra $100 per month (his original extra $50 plus the $50 minimum he no longer has to spend on Debt A) to put toward Debt B. Added to the minimum payment of $50 on Debt B, that means he can put $150 per month onto this bill. He’s been paying the $50 minimum for the past 21 months, though, so he only owes $1,117. At 6% interest, this allows him to pay off Debt B in 8 months.

Finally, Paul has an extra $150 per month to put toward Debt C (the minimum payment of Debt B plus the $100 extra he had). This, plus the required $50 minimum payment, allows him to pay $200 per month on this debt. At 12% interest, and having made the minimum payments the whole time, he still owes $996. He will pay it off in 6 months.

The total number of months it will take Paul to pay off her entire debt when starting with the lowest interest rate is 35 months — just shy of three years.

If you run this scenario backwards and start with a $100 monthly payment on Debt C, it will take 23 months to pay off. The balance on Debt B after that amount of time is still $1,028, so paying it off with $150 monthly payments will take an additional 7 months. Paying the minimum on Debt A all this time (30 months) leaves a balance of just $566. Paying Debt A at a rate of $200 per month will take 3 months. All three debts will be paid off in 33 months.

Paying off the larger interest rate first is faster than starting the lower rate. Two months may not seem like a big deal, but that’s an extra $200 in your pocket each month — and $400 is a good reason to plan carefully around the interest rates as you snowball.

The Bottom Line

To save money in the long run, it usually makes sense to pay down your highest interest rate loan or credit card first. It’s unlikely that you have loans that all have the same minimum payment, interest rate or balance, so it’s worth spending a half hour with a line of credit or loan calculator to play with the numbers. This will let you figure out exactly how long it will take to get rid of your debt depending on the order you pay them so you can make the right decision for your personal finances.

About the author

Beth Trach

Beth Trach

Elizabeth Trach is a writer and editor living in Newburyport, MA. She also sings in a band, grows almost all her own food, and occasionally even cooks it. You can catch up on all her adventures in frugal living and extreme gardening at Port Potager.

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